Breaking Down Barriers

 

CONFINED TO THE ROUND PEN FOR BAD BEHAVIOR

CONFINED TO THE ROUND PEN FOR BAD BEHAVIOR

Spick and Span 1/7/2014

Span got out today! He’s motivated to be with the other horses and apparently not totally content with his roommate. He knocked two fences down and left Spic, who would not cross the wire 6 inches off the ground. Span got in with the other horses. They commenced to chase him around (doing their normal horsey pecking order deal) and in the process Span knocked down a whole bunch of fences. He didn’t knock down the stallion’s fence, which showed some discretionary wisdom about which fences to knock down.

It’s my fault but also the extreme cold weather. I have been meaning to fix the fence. Electric fences do not work in cold temperatures, especially sub-zero cold temperatures, because electric fences require a ground (which is the ground) and a hot (which is a charged wire).  Normally around here the ground is nearly always wet except in extreme cold because ice is dry. In short, electric fences do not work in extreme cold without a ground wire. This can be overcome by running two wires side-by-side–a hot wire and a ground wire. The horse touches both wires and receives a shock. Over the summer with deer and windfalls knocking down the fence I’m not too religious about keeping the ground wire intact because the fences work fine without it most of the year.  My horses have been trained to be intimidated by the fence;  they don’t know the fence doesn’t work during the winter. I’ve been intending to upgrade the fence correctly, especially since I brought the two Halflingers here. I knew there was a possibility for trouble but it has been so cold that putting up and repairing fences requiring the use of fingers without gloves or mittens has been next to  impossible to do.

Between doing quick fixes on all the fences knocked down and chasing Spic all over the place through the 20+ inches of snow and 15° below zero temperatures pretty much all day until after dark, I finally got Spic and Span in the round pen and left them there. I was exhausted. I looked out this morning at Spick and Span, fed them some hay and could see Span hadn’t knocked the round pen down yet.

I managed to catch Span right away in the morning after the first time he got out and we accomplished some round penning. He did well. He started to join up with me but it’s more of a feeling that I have then action on his part. He is not as naturally trustful as Spic. I suspect he’s had some abuse in his past but it’s not extreme so I may be wrong. Span is a thinking, active horse. I like him a lot! I believe he could be a really great horse–or great trouble.

 

GOOD NIGHT BOYS

GOOD NIGHT BOYS

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